Centre for Research on Discretion and Paternalism Bergen

Espen Ringkjøb Stokke

Espen Ringkjøb Stokke

Research coordinator

espen.stokke@uib.no

Espen is the research coordinator at Centre for Research on Discretion and Paternalism, and recently submitted his thesis for a PhD on diaspora activism related to transitional justice. Espen’s fields of of activity include Research administration, Research communications, Organizational development and PI support.

Espen has previously worked as a seminar lecturer for undergraduate courses in political mobilization, and he has represented temporary staff in the local university democracy and served in several different committees. Previously he also worked at the Chr. Michelsen Institute focusing on development issues.

Recently submitted thesis for PhD degree on researching diasporas mobilizing for justice in the Middle East. (University of Bergen)

M.A. in Comparative Politics (University of Bergen)

B.A. in Comparative Politics (University of Bergen)

 

Doctoral Thesis. Stokke. 2021. “Diaspora Mobilization for Justice During Conflict: The Case of Syria.”

 

Stokke & Wiebelhaus-Brahm. 2019. Syrian diaspora mobilization: vertical coordination, patronage relations, and the challenges of fragmentation in the pursuit of transitional justice. Ethnic and Racial Studies. 1930-1949.

Stokke. 2019. Livet er både litt bedre og litt verre i Tunisia åtte år etter Ben Ali. [Life is both a little better and a little worse in Tunisia, eight years after Ben Ali.]

Get to know Espen

Can you describe your office space?

Quite empty at the moment, given that I only recently started at DIPA. I am not one who tends to decorate the office – at least I haven’t been in the past (presumably, empty coffee mugs are not considered decorations).

What is your background?

I have a background in Comparative Politics and recently submitted my dissertation for the degree of PhD from the University of Bergen. In this work I have examined the political mobilization of diasporas, focusing on how Syrian activists abroad have promoted transitional justice in context of the homeland war.

If you had to choose a different field, what would it be?

I have always been very curious about space. So, perhaps in an alternative universe (pun intended), I would study to become an astronomer.

Is there a TV-show you are binging?

I really don’t binge often because I hate to finish great shows too quickly. That said, if I was going to binge something right now, I think I would binge Lucifer. While it’s a typical American detective show, the celestial element really makes it interesting.

What are you listening to these days?

For me, music is all about context. I love to play drums and in that context I listen to jazz and funk. However, I would probably not fire that up at a friend’s party, but try to find something appropriate to that particular mood. Oh, and if I am in the need for some positive vibes, I love the playlist Feelin’ Good which is full of timeless hits!

Which podcast are you listening to right now and why?

I am an avid listener to the Economist Radio podcasts. They tackle so many different and interesting issues in a neat and effective way. In particular I like that in one and the same episode, they cover global news issues as well as relatively random, curious stuff – all with in-depth analysis. For example, one recent episode was dedicated to the war in Afghanistan, racial tensions in Singapore and why chewing gum lost its cool. Also, the episodes are precisely the length it takes for me to commute to and from the office.

And a place you’ve been where you’d like to go back?

There are so many places I would like to go back to. I think actually one of my all-time favorites would be Thailand or Iceland. Thailand for its tropical beauty, pleasant people and tasty food; Iceland for its fascinating landscape, blue lagoon and volcanos.